A Time to Give and a Time to Give Thanks

The twin impulses of generosity and gratitude benefit our mental and even physical health. More good news: They both increase with age.

Should You Quit Your Job to Care for a Loved One?

Before making the decision, consider the pros and cons, and optional solutions.

Five Caregiver Pet Peeves

The brother who never visits … the friend who does, but ignores your loved one … the "swooper" … If you have a friend or family member who is caring for an elderly loved one, you'll want to check out this list of things not to do.

"I'm Not a Caregiver … Yet!"

Planning ahead for caregiving is an important part of healthy aging.

When a Senior Loved One Has a Gambling Problem

Casinos today cater to older adults. For some, it's a pleasant day betting a few dollars. But for others, it's a serious habit.

When the Caregiving Dynamic Is Complicated

What happens when you agree to provide care for an elderly parent, but your relationship with Mom or Dad has been difficult?

Science Organization With 300 Nobel Laureates Confirms: Caregivers Need Help

The leading scientific organization in the U.S. calls for greater recognition and support for family caregivers, the bedrock of our elder care system.

Hosting the Holidays When Your Loved One Has Alzheimer’s Disease

You've always held a holiday party at your house, but now Mom has been diagnosed with dementia. Should you skip it this year?

The Complex Family Dynamics of Fall Prevention

September 22 is National Falls Prevention Awareness Day. Have you talked about this topic with senior loved ones? How did the conversation go?

Budget Tips for the Sandwich Generation


More young adults than ever before live with their parents—who also might be providing support for elderly relatives.

When Family Members Disagree About Elder Care

When "Mom loved you best!" and "What's best for Mom?" collide, putting aside old resentments is a necessary first step.

If It's Time to Downsize

Are you or a loved one moving to a smaller place? Here are some tips to make the process more manageable.

When You Can't Be Home for the Holidays

If it's not possible to celebrate with your elderly parents, here are some ways to make their day as special as possible.

Showing Appreciation for Family Caregivers

November is National Family Caregivers Month. Here are some great ways to honor these people who do so much for elderly loved ones.

Many Boomers Want to Age in (a New) Place


A surprising number of baby boomers are moving. Will their new homes be suitable if their care needs change?

Online Buzz: Grandparents Mending Fences

You've overstepped your boundaries when it comes to child-raising advice—now what?

Ten Healthy Ways to Celebrate National Grandparents Day

Grandparents and grandchildren influence each other's physical and emotional well-being in many powerful ways.

Online Buzz: The Millions of Millennials

Did you know that the baby boom generation has been surpassed in numbers by young people born between 1980 and 2000?

Marriage in the Golden Years

June is the traditional month for weddings—and often, for Golden Wedding anniversaries. How does marriage affect healthy aging?

Online Buzz: Baby Boomers Still Divorcing at a High Rate

The overall divorce rate is dropping. But members of the boomer generation continue to call it quits even as they grow older.

Should You Tell a "Fiblet" to a Parent With Dementia?

Is telling the truth always the best policy? Professional geriatric care managers offer advice on a sensitive subject.

The Youngest Caregivers

Few people realize that today millions of children under the age of 18 are providing care for older loved ones.

Having the Talk About Home Care

Professional in-home care agencies report an uptick in information calls in early January. The reason? The holidays are the time when out-of-town relatives are most likely to visit their elderly loved ones—and to realize that these seniors need help!

Why Does My Loved One Rummage and Hide Things?

When a person is living with Alzheimer's disease or a related condition, family caregivers are often troubled by changes in the way their loved one acts. These changes, sometimes referred to as "behaviors" or "negative behaviors," are better considered for what they truly are: expressions of the person's needs, as distorted by the effects of the disease. Empathy and understanding that there may be a rational reason behind seemingly irrational actions helps caregivers devise strategies for preserving their loved one's safety and dignity while making things easier for family.

Getting More Caregiving Help From Your Siblings

When the needs of aging parents change, one adult child often ends up doing the lion's share of the caregiving. Maybe this child lives nearby while others don't. Maybe she gets along better with Mom or Dad. Maybe he is in a better position to ask for flextime at work. Gender assumptions might be a factor—Princeton University researcher Angelina Grigoryeva recently confirmed that in the U.S., daughters still provide more than twice the amount of care to aging parents.

Spouse Caregivers in Sickness and in Health

These caregivers assist their spouses with medication management and many other medical/nursing tasks.

Online Buzz: Spousal Family Caregivers

For many couples, the "in sickness and in health" marriage vow plays out later in life with one of the spouses caring for the other. Perhaps an older spouse faces a chronic medical condition like Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease or is recovering from a stroke or undergoing cancer treatment. Whenever an elderly husband or wife takes on a greater care role for the other spouse, a number of physical, emotional and financial challenges can occur.

Alzheimer's Caregiving: Can You Help Too Much?

A common misperception is that most people with Alzheimer’s disease live in nursing homes or other care facilities. While supportive living communities provide a safe living environment for many people with dementia, the majority live at home, supported by our nation’s 15 million Alzheimer’s family caregivers.

Improving Family Dynamics With In-Home Care

Today’s family structure is more diverse than ever before. Families come in all shapes and sizes, from traditional nuclear families to multigenerational households to collections of people who choose to live as a family. Just as families are changing, caregiving also is changing. But one thing never changes: Older adults value their independence. Yet many seniors need help from others to be safe at home. They rely on spouses, adult children and other relatives who provide hands-on assistance and coordinate their care.