Managing High Blood Pressure With In-Home Care

Does your loved one have "white coat hypertension"? "Masked hypertension"? There are a lot of things to know when a senior has high blood pressure!

In-Home Care Supports Good Nutrition for People With Alzheimer's

March Is National Nutrition Month, a good time to focus on the special dietary challenges of seniors who are living with Alzheimer's disease or other dementia.

Seven Myths That Lead to Caregiver Guilt

November is Family Caregivers Month. Learn about a set of "I shoulds" that can make even the most conscientious caregiver feel bad.

Seniors and Medications: The Good, the Bad and the Dangerous

It's a balancing act: The medicines we take help us manage health conditions, but improperly used, they also can imperil our health.

The Complex Family Dynamics of Fall Prevention

September 22 is National Falls Prevention Awareness Day. Have you talked about this topic with senior loved ones? How did the conversation go?

Stepping In, Stepping Up: Legal Issues for Family Caregivers

Durable powers of attorney, guardianship, employee responsibilities—all may come into play when a senior loved one needs help.

Seven Stress-Busting Tips for Alzheimer's Caregivers

Providing care for a loved one with dementia can significantly raise the caregiver's risk of heart disease, depression, even dementia.

Experts Say the Rate of Dementia Is Declining

The number of seniors living with Alzheimer's continues to climb—yet the percentage seems to be trending downward. What's behind this unexpected but welcome news?

When Family Members Disagree About Elder Care

When "Mom loved you best!" and "What's best for Mom?" collide, putting aside old resentments is a necessary first step.

Preserving Social Connections When a Loved One Has Alzheimer's

The need to spend time with others is a powerful human need, even when a person is living with memory loss.

Is This Senior Patient Ready to Go Home?

Older patients may overstate their ability to take care of themselves after hospital discharge, say experts.

Alzheimer's Disease Caregivers Ask: "Am I at Risk?"

Families often are confused about whether a loved one's Alzheimer’s disease is "in the genes."

Home Care Helps Seniors Who Are Living With Heart Failure

Exercise, diet and ongoing medical monitoring ensure the best quality of life for seniors with heart failure—yet the condition makes it hard to do these things.

Home Care Supports Our Senior Neighbors

New studies reveal the health benefits of living in a neighborhood where we feel connected to others.

It Makes Sense

Diminished sight, hearing, taste, smell and touch make it harder for seniors to remain active and engaged. Professional in-home caregivers can help.

In-Home Care Supports Active Independence for Seniors

It's a paradox: Exercise is important for managing health conditions, yet chronic illness and adverse health events make it hard to be physically active.

Should You Tell a "Fiblet" to a Parent With Dementia?

Is telling the truth always the best policy? Professional geriatric care managers offer advice on a sensitive subject.

The Youngest Caregivers

Few people realize that today millions of children under the age of 18 are providing care for older loved ones.

U.S. Census: More Seniors Are Living With Disabilities, Fewer in Nursing Homes

In June 2014, the U.S. Census Bureau released "65+ in the United States: 2010," a major report about our nation's seniors, based on data collected during the most recent census. Said the Census Bureau's Enrique Lamas, "The findings, released with the National Institute on Aging (NIA) at the National Institutes of Health, provide the most detailed information available on the demographic, economic, and health and wellness characteristics of this rapidly growing dynamic population."

Talking About the Future With Adult Children

Many Caring Right at Home readers are baby boomers who are providing care for their elderly parents. When it comes to planning for their own senior years, you would think these savvy people would have great communication with their own adult children! Yet studies show that even baby boomers often avoid these conversations until a health crisis or other challenge to independence arises.

Is Living at Home a Safe Choice for Your Loved One?

Deciding where to live is an important part of planning for our senior years. Should we stay in our own home? Live with other family members? Move to a retirement community, assisted living or other supportive environment?

Daily Activities for People With Alzheimer's Disease

As reported in the November 2012 issue of the Caring Right at Home e-newsletter, the majority of Americans with Alzheimer's disease and related conditions are living at home with the support of spouses, adult children and others who step in to serve as caregivers. Is living at home the best environment for these patients? And how do families cope with their loved one's increasing needs?

Medication Management Prevents Unnecessary Hospital Trips for Seniors

A recent poll in Caring Right at Home found that more than a third of respondents take five or more medications. Could the medicines we take send us to the hospital? As our population ages, medication management is more important than ever.

In-Home Care Supports Stroke Recovery

Most stroke survivors have the goal of returning to live independently at home. But even with the help of family caregivers, recovery can be a challenge. What support services promote the highest possible level of recovery?

Improving Family Dynamics With In-Home Care

Today’s family structure is more diverse than ever before. Families come in all shapes and sizes, from traditional nuclear families to multigenerational households to collections of people who choose to live as a family. Just as families are changing, caregiving also is changing. But one thing never changes: Older adults value their independence. Yet many seniors need help from others to be safe at home. They rely on spouses, adult children and other relatives who provide hands-on assistance and coordinate their care.

Creating Appetizing Meals for Seniors

Good nutrition is vital for the health and well-being of older adults. Yet when it comes to eating well, this time of life brings challenges. Disabilities, chronic health conditions and medications can all affect the appetite. Taste and smell often decline. Missing teeth, uncomfortable dentures and digestive problems can make eating uncomfortable. And for many with Parkinson’s disease, arthritis, MS or stroke, eating is more of a challenge than a pleasure.