A Senior-Savvy Police Force

Gerontologists urge law enforcement agencies to improve encounters with older adults.

Coming Home After Joint Replacement Surgery

Recovery in a patient's own home after a hip or knee replacement offers many advantages.

Should You Quit Your Job to Care for a Loved One?

Before making the decision, consider the pros and cons, and optional solutions.

The Right Clothes for Senior Independence

As seniors deal with physical and cognitive challenges, their wardrobes most likely can use some updating.

Growing Awareness of a Senior Epidemic

"Unbefriended" elders are vulnerable to a host of health problems.

Hosting the Holidays When Your Loved One Has Alzheimer’s Disease

You've always held a holiday party at your house, but now Mom has been diagnosed with dementia. Should you skip it this year?

Concern for Seniors Cuts Across Party Lines

Most Americans want to grow older in their own homes. What can our government agencies do to help make this possible?

If It's Time to Downsize

Are you or a loved one moving to a smaller place? Here are some tips to make the process more manageable.

It Makes Sense

Diminished sight, hearing, taste, smell and touch make it harder for seniors to remain active and engaged. Professional in-home caregivers can help.

Online Buzz: Baby Boomers Are Staying Put

Is retirement time also the time to downsize? A new survey reveals a surprising trend.

Five Brain Health Reminders for Family Caregivers

Family caregivers do so much for their loved ones that they sometimes neglect their own health—and that could put them at higher risk for Alzheimer's disease.

In-Home Care Supports Active Independence for Seniors

It's a paradox: Exercise is important for managing health conditions, yet chronic illness and adverse health events make it hard to be physically active.

Include Care Support in Your Retirement Planning

We hope that our later years will be marked by good health. But our goal should be the best quality of life, even if things turn out differently.

Online Buzz: Backyard, High-Tech Cottages for Seniors Provide Peace of Mind for Caregivers

Here's an innovative new supportive housing option for older adults.

10 Healthy Aging Tips for Santa

Dear Santa,

We know that at this time of year, your mailbox at the North Pole is overflowing! But we hope you'll take time to read our wish list for you—the gift of healthy lifestyle choices. We're making our list and checking it twice to find ways for you to stay active and engaged for years to come!

Online Buzz: University-Based Retirement Communities Offer an Alternative to Traditional Retirement

Golf, bridge and bingo not exactly on your retirement list? How about football, zoology and theater? A growing number of American seniors are opting out of traditional retirement communities, lush with golf courses and nearby shopping, for university-based retirement communities, or UBRCs.

Online Buzz: Skype Is the New Prozac

When doctors prescribe anti-depressants like Prozac or Cymbalta, seniors often balk at the idea because they prefer non-medication approaches. On restricted incomes, many elderly simply can't afford another prescription or psychotherapy. But medical and social researchers are investigating a new form of depression assistance for older adults—personal counseling via computer screen.

U.S. Census: More Seniors Are Living With Disabilities, Fewer in Nursing Homes

In June 2014, the U.S. Census Bureau released "65+ in the United States: 2010," a major report about our nation's seniors, based on data collected during the most recent census. Said the Census Bureau's Enrique Lamas, "The findings, released with the National Institute on Aging (NIA) at the National Institutes of Health, provide the most detailed information available on the demographic, economic, and health and wellness characteristics of this rapidly growing dynamic population."

Deciding to Serve as a Family Caregiver: Eight Factors to Consider

In our rapidly aging society, more and more of us find ourselves transitioning into the role of caregiver for an older relative.

Online Buzz: Testing for Early Cognitive Troubles

How are a bicycle and a train similar? How many nickels are in 35 cents? These are two of the questions in a short assessment called the Self-Administered Gerocognitive Examination (SAGE) that helps detect early signs of cognitive, memory and thinking difficulties. With just a pen and paper, test takers can answer the simple 22 questions in roughly 10–15 minutes.

Is Living at Home a Safe Choice for Your Loved One?

Deciding where to live is an important part of planning for our senior years. Should we stay in our own home? Live with other family members? Move to a retirement community, assisted living or other supportive environment?

Selecting the Right Hearing Aid

"Dad, turn down the TV, it’s too loud!" This is often the first sign that an older loved one is experiencing hearing loss. Hearing loss can shut seniors out of conversations and make it difficult to hear instructions or even the doorbell. Almost a third of people older than age 60 have reduced ability to hear—yet many older adults are resistant to using hearing aids.

Online Buzz: Home Safety Tips for Seniors

For seniors who live alone, staying safe is imperative. Recognizing the importance of keeping aging loved ones safe at home, Right at Home has compiled an extensive Home Safety Checklist for family caregivers to use to ensure their older loved ones avoid home safety hazards.

Aging at Home ... With Robots?

Robots have the potential to help older adults with daily activities that can become more challenging with age. But are people willing to use this new technology? A study by the Georgia Institute of Technology indicates the answer is yes, unless the tasks involve personal care or social activities.

Online Buzz: Compulsive Hoarding

Do you know someone who can’t throw anything away? "I may need it again someday!" they protest, and resist any encouragement from friends and family to discard useless objects.

Smile Your Stress Away

An earlier issue of Caring Right at Home examined the many healthy aging benefits of humor and laughter. Numerous studies reveal that laughing promotes physical, emotional, intellectual and social well-being. Now, an intriguing new study from the University of Kansas suggests that laughter’s more subdued cousin, the smile, also may offer health benefits—even if you are only faking that grin!

Fighting the Stigma of Alzheimer's Disease

A recent report from Alzheimer's Disease International (ADI) focused on negative attitudes about the disease and the impact on people diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, as well as the effect on their families.

Supporting Single Seniors

The latest U.S. Census showed that fewer Americans are marrying, and fewer are having children. The American Geriatrics Society (AGS) recently urged federal, state and local agencies to ensure that all seniors are served, regardless of marital status. This includes attention to the challenges faced by single seniors.