Connecting the Generations

Seniors suffer from a lack of engagement with younger people.

Should You Quit Your Job to Care for a Loved One?

Before making the decision, consider the pros and cons, and optional solutions.

Five Caregiver Pet Peeves

The brother who never visits … the friend who does, but ignores your loved one … the "swooper" … If you have a friend or family member who is caring for an elderly loved one, you'll want to check out this list of things not to do.

How to Create an Emergency Health Information Checklist

If a health emergency strikes, you need up-to-date information about your health conditions, healthcare providers and more—at your fingertips.

"I'm Not a Caregiver … Yet!"

Planning ahead for caregiving is an important part of healthy aging.

Exercise Can Save Your Life. Can It Save You Money?

Experts crunch the data and find that physically active people spend less on healthcare, even if they're living with a health condition.

Warn Senior Friends and Loved Ones About IRS Scams

"You owe back taxes! Pay right now or go to jail!" Con artists impersonating the Internal Revenue Service may call, email and even text their victims. Learn how to spot these fraudsters.

When a Senior Loved One Has a Gambling Problem

Casinos today cater to older adults. For some, it's a pleasant day betting a few dollars. But for others, it's a serious habit.

Online Buzz: Suggestions to Diminish Caregiver Expenses

Caregiving costs can add up fast. Don't miss out on tax breaks and other ways to save your money.

Science Organization With 300 Nobel Laureates Confirms: Caregivers Need Help

The leading scientific organization in the U.S. calls for greater recognition and support for family caregivers, the bedrock of our elder care system.

Concern for Seniors Cuts Across Party Lines

Most Americans want to grow older in their own homes. What can our government agencies do to help make this possible?

Online Buzz: Financial Advice for Widows

Grief from losing a spouse is magnified by uncertainty about legal and financial matters.

A Labor Day Salute to Senior Workers

More older Americans than ever are working past the traditional age of retirement. How are companies changing to meet their needs?

Stepping In, Stepping Up: Legal Issues for Family Caregivers

Durable powers of attorney, guardianship, employee responsibilities—all may come into play when a senior loved one needs help.

Budget Tips for the Sandwich Generation


More young adults than ever before live with their parents—who also might be providing support for elderly relatives.

Baby Boomers Need to Talk About Care

Boomers have a reputation for being health-conscious, but they and their adult children should know they may need more care than their parents did.

Online Buzz: 4 Online Safety Tips for Older Adults

Phishing, phony sweepstakes and too-good-to-be-true offers ... cyber-scammers often target seniors.

Happy New Year, Happier Older Years

Put a few items on your list of New Year's resolutions that will benefit you well beyond 2016.

Diverse group of seniors bowling

Preparing for a Nation of Older Brains

How are seniors and society affected by normal age-related changes of memory and thinking?

Paying for In-Home Care

Home care helps millions of seniors remain safe and independent in their own homes. Most families pay for home care themselves, but they should be aware of all their options.

Talking to Senior Loved Ones About Scams

Every year, older adults lose billions of dollars to con artists. But there's an art to having a cautionary conversation on this topic with elderly relatives.

Include Care Support in Your Retirement Planning

We hope that our later years will be marked by good health. But our goal should be the best quality of life, even if things turn out differently.

Online Buzz: Baby Boomers Still Divorcing at a High Rate

The overall divorce rate is dropping. But members of the boomer generation continue to call it quits even as they grow older.

Five Myths and Facts About Seniors and Supplements

Seniors spend billions each year on vitamins and herbal preparations. Are these products helpful? Are they safe?

Online Buzz: Prepaid Debit Cards Protect Seniors

Older adults are at higher risk of fraud, but may balk at having someone else control their money. Here’s a look at a good compromise.

Hospital Observation Care Can Be Costly for Medicare Patients

Some seniors think Medicare made a mistake. Others are stunned when they find out that being in a hospital for days doesn't always mean they were actually admitted. Instead, they received observation care, considered by Medicare to be an outpatient service. The observation designation means they can have higher out-of-pocket expenses and fewer Medicare benefits.

Talking About the End of Life

Most of us tend to avoid thinking about our own death. Yet studies show that people who consider their own mortality are more likely to make healthy lifestyle choices. Being in denial does not make us happier or healthier.

Home Care Agencies vs. Registries: What's the Difference?

Mom has fallen several times. She sometimes forgets to take her medications, the house is obviously not being kept up, and Dad, who has his own health problems, isn't strong enough to help her out of bed or to the bathroom. Family members help out at first, but busy as they are with jobs and other responsibilities, they are quickly overwhelmed by the caregiving and home maintenance tasks. The family realizes that it's time to hire an in-home caregiver.

Talking About the Future With Adult Children

Many Caring Right at Home readers are baby boomers who are providing care for their elderly parents. When it comes to planning for their own senior years, you would think these savvy people would have great communication with their own adult children! Yet studies show that even baby boomers often avoid these conversations until a health crisis or other challenge to independence arises.

Online Buzz: Is Your Senior Loved One's Money Safe?

At first, the signs of misuse of a senior’s finances may seem quite innocuous—an unpaid bill or purchase of an item the older person doesn’t need. However, these may be initial warning signs that can lead to large or unexplained bank account withdrawals or transfers, unfamiliar signatures on checks and documents, and changes in banks, attorneys or wills.